#16: The Beauty of Posthuman Dissolvement

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These weeks brought about some beautiful posthuman reads. Ethnography and the Distributed-Centered Subject and Blueprint for a Better Human Body go in line with Rosi Braidotti's 'The Posthuman'. They show very well in actual cases how our subjectivity is a distributed, nomadic and multiple other.

The Rat Paths of New York and Monkeys' cosy alliance with wolves looks like domestication are about the human-animal connection. The monkey-wolve alliance tells us, that domestication is actually a bidirectional process.

And then there is A Self-Folding Origami Robot That Can Walk, Climb, Dig, Carry, Swim and Dissolve into Nothing!

Ethnography and the Distributed-Centered Subject

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Where is "he" then? Paradoxically, I showed that it is because his intellectual competences, his identity, and even his own body, are more distributed, collectivized and materialized than those of any one else, that he is the most singular of all.

Blueprint for a Better Human Body

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What was once an industry bent on replicating the human body exactly, the world of prosthetics has started thinking more creatively about what the human body can be. [...] The human body, and what people consider the "normal" human body, can be a whole lot more than what's biologically possible.

The Rat Paths of New York

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Illustration by Louise Zergaeng Pomeroy

Most New York animals stay close to home. Yes, itinerant coyotes will traverse the parks by night, and raccoons might travel half a mile in search of better trash, skunks a little less. But feral cats won't stray three blocks beyond where they were born, and few mice will venture more than a hundred feet from their burrows in a lifetime. Rats seldom stray far from home, either. But they get where they're going more easily than other New York animals, because they are more like us. The city suits them.

Monkeys' cosy alliance with wolves looks like domestication

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In the alpine grasslands of eastern Africa, Ethiopian wolves and gelada monkeys are giving peace a chance. The geladas - a type of baboon - tolerate wolves wandering right through the middle of their herds, while the wolves ignore potential meals of baby geladas in favour of rodents, which they can catch more easily when the monkeys are present.

A Self-Folding Origami Robot That Can Walk, Climb, Dig, Carry, Swim and Dissolve into Nothing

https://youtu.be/f0CluQiwLRg